Learn about our open data and how you can use it

We currently have 4 high elevation sites that are generating data in Zimbabwe and Malawi. These sites are serviced and maintained by our local technicians. The data is transmitted to a datalogger and you can get readings of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, rainfall and solar radiation. The data is uploaded every hour and every 24 hours, and the historical data can be downloaded and exported.

How to access our data

Our data is freely available to anyone who needs it for policy making, scientific research and academic studies by clicking on the links below.

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Questions about how you can use our data? See our FAQ’s below for answers.

Mount Mulanje in Malawi is the region’s third-highest peak, with its 3,002m Sapitwa summit and a very striking landscape.

Located near the Mozambique border, it boasts rugged cliffs, lush flora, and diverse wildlife. The climate varies with altitude, featuring a tropical climate with temperatures between 15 – 25°C on the lower slopes and cooler conditions ranging from 5 – 15°C at higher elevations. The wettest season is from November to April, receiving 1,500mm to 2,500mm of rainfall. The mountain’s unique topography results in distinct ecosystems, from tropical rainforests on lower slopes to montane grasslands and heathlands at higher altitudes, harboring many endemic plant species, including the rare Mulanje Cedar and Mulanje Cycad. The grasslands and heathlands are home to various gladiolus and orchid species, some exclusive to the region.

The installation of our weather station on the side of Mount Mulanje was challenging. All our equipment was ported to the summit by hand and required the help and support of our partners at the Mount Mulanje Conservation Trust. Our installation team led by Professor Colin Everson and Dr Terry Everson from The University of KwaZulu-Natal climbed 11.5km trekking through wind, rain and sunshine with a combined weight of 150kg up the side of the mountain for the 8 hour climb. The installation was very successful and the weather is being monitored on the side of Mount Mulanje on Lichenya Plateau at a height of 1890 metres for the first time.

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Questions about how you can use our data? See our FAQ’s below for answers.

Nyika Plateau, a unique floral haven, boasts 200 wildflower and orchid species, mostly in montane grasslands, with seven of the species exclusive to the plateau.

With a diverse climate due to high altitude, warm months reach up to 25°C, while cooler months drop below freezing. The wet season between November and March sees 100-200 mm monthly rainfall.

The installation of our weather station on the Plateau was relatively straightforward as the site could be accessed by road so though the journey was long and bumpy our installation team led by Professor Colin Everson and Dr Terry Everson from The University of KwaZulu-Natal drove everything straight to the site.

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Questions about how you can use our data? See our FAQ’s below for answers.

The Bvumba Highlands lie southeast of Mutare and form the central section of the Manica Highlands, a chain of mountains along the border of Zimbabwe and Mozambique. The Bvumba mountains are slightly lower than Nyanga, rising to a peak of 1911m on Castle Beacon and 1714 m on Chinyakwaremba. The climate is moderate with a warm rainy season (average annual rainfall is 1800 mm) extending from November to March, and a cool winter from May to August. Frosts are not common. Periodically the Bvumba is affected by summer cyclones originating in the Indian Ocean.

The eastern slopes support moist evergreen indigenous forests, receiving orographic rainfall and frequent mists from the warm moist air blowing in from Mozambique. The leeward western slopes are drier and warmer, supporting Miombo (Brachystegia) woodland and savanna. Bare granite cliffs and scree slopes with scattered Strelizia nicolai occur along the edges of some mountains, with the tops covered in short montane grassland and heathland. Much of the Bvumba is privately owned farms and smallholdings, amongst large commercial eucalypt, pine and wattle plantations.

Alien invasive plants such as blackwood, wattle, bee bush and ornamental ginger threaten the biodiversity of the forests and montane grasslands.

The installation of our weather station in the Bvumba Mountains was our first and was led by Dr Alistiar Clulow from The University of KwaZulu-Natal with the help of our partners at the Seldom Seen Eco Tourist Lodge.

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Questions about how you can use our data? See our FAQ’s below for answers.

Nyanga is located in North-eastern Zimbabwe north of Muare and close to the Mozambique boarder. Within Nynaga is one of the oldest protected areas, the Nyanaga National Park. The altitude ranges from 700 metres in the Pungwe Valley to 2592 metres on Mt Nyangani, the highest mountain in Zimbabwe. Surrounding the park are small-scale farmlands, orchards and large commercial plantations of pine and eucalyptus.

The climate is moderate ranging from 5-28C in the summer months (September-March). The winters (June – August) are characterised with frost and overcast days. The average annual rainfall is 1237mm although tropical storms periodically result in elevated rainfall totals. Nynaga is characterised by scenic grassland, interspersed with fynbos-like vegetation on the plateau summit unique dwarf Brachystegia speciforms woodland, moist montane forest and patches of medium to low altitude rainforest in the Honde and Pungwe Valleys. Exotic species such as Black Wattle, Eucalyptus and Pine were introduced as commercial species and have since become invasive and threaten the biodiversity of the area.

The installation of our weather station in Nyanga National Park was led by Dr Alistiar Clulow from The University of KwaZulu-Natal with the help of our partners at Zim Parks including the ecologist Kundai Dube. Torrential rain fell throughout the installation and our team had to resort to wrapping themselves in bubble wrap to protect themselves from the wind and rain.

Data FAQs

Yes but we ask you to please acknowledge us as your data source with the following:

“We thank the African Mountain Research Foundation for the provision of meteorological data. Interested parties may contact info@africanmountianresearch.com for data access”

Yes, we provide all our data to the National Meteorological agencies and they then integrate our data into their systems.

Yes, we really want people to get involved and to contact us if they are keen to use our data and know of good high elevation sites for our next station. If you would like to find out more contact us on  info@africanmountainresearch.com

AMRF always works under agreement of national or regional governments. Typically, an MOU with the National Meteorological Agency defines the modus operandi in a country. It is also possible that, in case of externally funded projects, AMRF has agreements with other government agencies or NGOs that already have agreements in place with their local governments.

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Mountains Matter. They are home to 15% of the world’s population, host about half of the world’s biodiversity hotspots, provide freshwater for everyday life to half of the global population and help to sustain agriculture and supply clean energy and medicines. Help us to protect them.

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